How things change. Not the differences in 32 Squadron badge from when I joined 32 in the  50’s (below) to the present day. 

First the lower badge has an Heraldic Kings crown with a arched curved bar on top as King George was on the throne when my badge was made. The upper badge has an indented bar for a queens crown. 

Lower badge has 32 in Arabic numerals, upper has Roman numerals. 

Lower Badge describes thirty two as a Fighter Squadron, upper  it become The Royal Squadron. Come up in the world from grubbing around in the desert.

The Latin motto means “Rally round comrades”

Incidently :—  The official toast of 32 Fighter Squadron used on formal occasions was “Wives and Sweethearts——May they never meet”

From HERE

Despite having in the past studied Napoleon’s career in depth it wasn’t until I saw this picture that  I found I had  totally the wrong idea about  Napoleon Bonaparte. THIS IS the real Napoleon Bonaparte. At least as Cosplayed by Angela Clayton. Tell you what, I vastly prefer Angela’s version to the one I had been brought up with.

More Angela HERE photographed by the superb Anna Fischer

Despite having in the past studied Napoleon’s career in depth it wasn’t until I saw this picture that  I found I had  totally the wrong idea about  Napoleon Bonaparte. THIS IS the real Napoleon Bonaparte. At least as Cosplayed by Angela Clayton. Tell you what, I vastly prefer Angela’s version to the one I had been brought up with.

More Angela HERE photographed by the superb Anna Fischer

Eastbourne —-continued

We had another trip out to Lewes, to Anne of Cleves House, which was a misnomer as while the house was given to her in a very generous divorce settlement by Henry VIII after six months of marriage she never lived in it or even saw it. It was a very hot day and it was just an ordinary Tudor house so after a quick look round the more crafty of the passengers took themselves into the garden and sat in the shade of the Medlar tree you  see in the top picture. We knew it was a medlar tree because it had a plaque on it saying so. It grows a fruit like a small brown apple that is too hard to eat, you have to leave it until it goes rotten before you can get your teeth into it.  Ugh   

When the coach driver came to shepherd us back onto the coach he complained “I’ve brought you all this way to see this fascinating historical house and all you’ve done is sit in the garden and look at a tree”

"Ah" quoth Cloggy  " but this is a very historical tree, a Medlar tree planted by Anne of Cleves herself"

He took us down into the centre of Lewes where Lady C and I found a table in the shade at a cafe and took tea. We essayed a look at the High Street but feeling a blast of coolth from the  doorway of a Sports shop we went inside and enjoyed their air conditioning until it was time for the coach to roll again.

On the way back to the coach I took a picture of the River Ouse and Harveys Brewery, in the yard of which are stacked hundreds of casks of ale ready for delivery. We had with us a second driver, a local man, who gave us a commentary on points of interest. He told us that in the Great Flood  of the year 2000 , the river took these full casks and distributed them far and wide and Harveys took adverts in the papers asking for the casks  to be returned but not the contents. This driver told us he found 6 in his garden and disposed of the contents in a traditional and eco-friendly way before taking the emptys  back.

NB:— we also have a River Ouse here in Yorkshire and there is a Great and Little Ouse in East Anglia. It is Anglo-Saxon for slow flowing.

Lady Boudicca and I holidayed in the South Coast resort of Eastbourne last week. As you can see the beach (above) was absolutely thronged with holiday makers. We were staying in The Cumberland (also above) with our tour coach in front. We had a very interesting day at Hever Castle, Anne Boleyn’s childhood home. It was surprisingly fortified for the Tudor period with a moat and drawbridge.

Lady Boudicca Clogiron stood in front of Hever Castle gatehouse and drawbridge

View across moat from a bedroom. Just think, Anne Boleyn would have stood at this window and seen this view 500 years ago.

Another Royal mistress who had an influence on English coinage was Katherine Swynford.She was the mistress of John of Gaunt and bore him several children.When Gaunt’s second wife died he made an honest woman of Katherine and got the king, his brother to legitamise the children.They were give the name Beaufort and this badge of a Portcullis. When Henry VII grabbed the throne part of his dubious claim was his descent from Katherine Swynford so he adopted the Portcullis as one of his badges. With it’s history of illegitimacy and double dealing it is entirely appropriate it is now the badge of the House of Commons.

Another Royal mistress who had an influence on English coinage was Katherine Swynford.She was the mistress of John of Gaunt and bore him several children.When Gaunt’s second wife died he made an honest woman of Katherine and got the king, his brother to legitamise the children.They were give the name Beaufort and this badge of a Portcullis.
When Henry VII grabbed the throne part of his dubious claim was his descent from Katherine Swynford so he adopted the Portcullis as one of his badges.
With it’s history of illegitimacy and double dealing it is entirely appropriate it is now the badge of the House of Commons.

A 50pence coin showing Britannia. The model for Britannia was Frances Stuart, one of King Charles II mistresses. Not one of his first line mistresses but well up in the pack According to “The Mistresses of King Charles II” Frances was very proud of her elegant legs and would obligingly lift her skirts to display them to any one who professed an admiration for them.
Not many people know that.

A 50pence coin showing Britannia. The model for Britannia was Frances Stuart, one of King Charles II mistresses. Not one of his first line mistresses but well up in the pack According to “The Mistresses of King Charles II” Frances was very proud of her elegant legs and would obligingly lift her skirts to display them to any one who professed an admiration for them.

Not many people know that.