DIESELPUNK
Auto Union Type D
Quote:—-“Leading up to the end of 1937, Auto Union had won 32 of 54 races and needed a new contender for the upcoming restrictions that allowed a three-liter supercharged car with a minimum weight of 850 kgs. For this new formula they developed the Type D which raced alongside the best from Delahaye and Mercedes-Benz in the later half of 1938.”
From HERE

DIESELPUNK

Auto Union Type D

Quote:—-“Leading up to the end of 1937, Auto Union had won 32 of 54 races and needed a new contender for the upcoming restrictions that allowed a three-liter supercharged car with a minimum weight of 850 kgs. For this new formula they developed the Type D which raced alongside the best from Delahaye and Mercedes-Benz in the later half of 1938.”

From HERE

DIESELPUNK

Quote:—-Most engine collectors daydream of the “find of a lifetime”: Waiting in some forgotten barn or pump house, a very rare engine lies waiting, undiscovered, until fortune smiles and this engine comes home. For the vast majority of us, this is only a dream. For Bill Grimley, the dream became a reality. He came upon a 10 HP Schleicher, Schumm & Co. engine in an old factory in the 1970s when he was following up on a lead.

Company history

James and Adolph Schleicher came from Germany to the U.S. and, in 1876, set up a partnership to control N.A. Otto & Cie.’s patents in the U.S., and build and market their atmospheric engines. Before they were able to build any, Otto developed the 4-cycle “silent” engine, and it was this engine that they put into production. In 1877, they were joined by Herman Schumm, in Philadelphia, and set up Schleicher, Schumm & Co. in 1880. Nine engines were built that first year. The earliest engines were flame ignition slide-valve engines designed to run on illuminating gas, which was available in the larger cities at the time. These engines were available as late as 1892. In 1894 the company came under control of Gasmotoren-Fabrik Deutz and was reorganized as the Otto Gas Engine Works.

From HERE

DIESELPUNK
Auto Union Type A
"Porsche had previously been employed by Austro Daimler and Mercedes-Benz for whom he designed the highly successful S-Type racing car. Almost a decade earlier Rosenberg had successfully raced a mid-engined car and he convinced Porsche to follow that route for their new Grand Prix racer. They felt there were several major benefits of this layout. Firstly there would be considerably more weight on the rear axle, which should improve traction. Another advantage was that a prop-shaft running through the driver’s compartment was no longer required. This meant that the driver could sit considerably lower in the car, lowering the centre of gravity and also the wind resistance.The location of the engine was just the first of many unconventional design elements of the Porsche/Auto Union Grand Prix car. Even though Porsche was restricted to a maximum weight of 750 kg, he opted for a sixteen cylinder engine, keeping the mass down by using exotic alloys for the block and head. The cylinders were angled at 45 degrees, leaving just enough space for the intake manifold, which fed from the rear of the engine by a huge Rootes-Type Supercharger. Porsche opted for a simple and lightweight valvetrain consisting of a central camshaft, operating the valves to push-rods and rockers. In its first version, displacing just under 4.4 litres, the V16 engine produced 295 bhp at just 4500 rpm.”
Pic From HERE
Text from HERE

DIESELPUNK

Auto Union Type A

"Porsche had previously been employed by Austro Daimler and Mercedes-Benz for whom he designed the highly successful S-Type racing car. Almost a decade earlier Rosenberg had successfully raced a mid-engined car and he convinced Porsche to follow that route for their new Grand Prix racer. They felt there were several major benefits of this layout. Firstly there would be considerably more weight on the rear axle, which should improve traction. Another advantage was that a prop-shaft running through the driver’s compartment was no longer required. This meant that the driver could sit considerably lower in the car, lowering the centre of gravity and also the wind resistance.

The location of the engine was just the first of many unconventional design elements of the Porsche/Auto Union Grand Prix car. Even though Porsche was restricted to a maximum weight of 750 kg, he opted for a sixteen cylinder engine, keeping the mass down by using exotic alloys for the block and head. The cylinders were angled at 45 degrees, leaving just enough space for the intake manifold, which fed from the rear of the engine by a huge Rootes-Type Supercharger. Porsche opted for a simple and lightweight valvetrain consisting of a central camshaft, operating the valves to push-rods and rockers. In its first version, displacing just under 4.4 litres, the V16 engine produced 295 bhp at just 4500 rpm.”

Pic From HERE

Text from HERE

DIESELPUNK-Streamline Steam

"She arrived wreathed in steam and gleaming in the sunshine.

And this Grand Old Lady of the railways was given an enthusiastic welcome to Huddersfield by a clutch of steam buffs.

They gathered on the platform at Huddersfield railway station to welcome Bittern, an A4 Pacific class locomotive and sister to the record-breaking steam engine Mallard.

Bittern called into town for a 20-minute stop on her journey from the Crewe Heritage Centre to the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, where she will spend much of the summer.

Martin Wood, of Huddersfield, was one of the steam enthusiasts there to greet her.”

“Bittern passed through Huddersfield about a month ago on her way to Crewe from The Great Gathering of steam engines at the National Railway Museum in York, but did not stop.”

From HERE