DIESELPUNK
Quote :-  ”In 1896, Dr. Edwin J. Fithian, of Portersville, Pa., applied for a patent of a 2-cycle gas cylinder that could convert a steam engine into a gas engine. This was very successful and the “half-breed” engine was born. He soon teamed with John Carruthers, an excellent machinist and manager, to keep up with the demand. Not long after, a complete 2-cycle gas engine was also being manufactured. The new firm chose the name Bessemer Gas Engine Co. for their growing factory.
At this time, the steel industry was expanding in Pittsburgh, with the addition of the new Bessemer converter to make consistently high-quality steel. This was designed by Sir Henry Bessemer, 1813-1898, an English inventor who designed his process in 1856. To feed Pittsburgh’s appetite for iron ore, the Bessemer and Lake Erie Railroad was formed. The northern terminal was Conneaut, Ohio, where the lake boats could discharge their cargos of iron ore with the huge Hulett unloaders directly into the railroad cars. This railroad still exists today.
So with the name of Bessemer being synonymous with success and progress, why not use it for the new firm? It seems that the growing engine maker did just that. Note that this connection is the author’s supposition and not documented fact. With the oil boom in that era and the demand for quality engines, the business grew. They were always securing new markets and making improved design changes. After many mergers, Bessemer still exists today, although no longer in Grove City, Pa. Bessemer merged with G. & C. Cooper of Mt. Vernon, Ohio, in 1929 to form Cooper-Bessemer. The name was changed to Cooper Industries in 1965. Today, they are the Compression Systems part of Cameron International Corp., based in Houston, Texas.”
From HERE

DIESELPUNK

Quote :-  ”In 1896, Dr. Edwin J. Fithian, of Portersville, Pa., applied for a patent of a 2-cycle gas cylinder that could convert a steam engine into a gas engine. This was very successful and the “half-breed” engine was born. He soon teamed with John Carruthers, an excellent machinist and manager, to keep up with the demand. Not long after, a complete 2-cycle gas engine was also being manufactured. The new firm chose the name Bessemer Gas Engine Co. for their growing factory.

At this time, the steel industry was expanding in Pittsburgh, with the addition of the new Bessemer converter to make consistently high-quality steel. This was designed by Sir Henry Bessemer, 1813-1898, an English inventor who designed his process in 1856. To feed Pittsburgh’s appetite for iron ore, the Bessemer and Lake Erie Railroad was formed. The northern terminal was Conneaut, Ohio, where the lake boats could discharge their cargos of iron ore with the huge Hulett unloaders directly into the railroad cars. This railroad still exists today.

So with the name of Bessemer being synonymous with success and progress, why not use it for the new firm? It seems that the growing engine maker did just that. Note that this connection is the author’s supposition and not documented fact. With the oil boom in that era and the demand for quality engines, the business grew. They were always securing new markets and making improved design changes. After many mergers, Bessemer still exists today, although no longer in Grove City, Pa. Bessemer merged with G. & C. Cooper of Mt. Vernon, Ohio, in 1929 to form Cooper-Bessemer. The name was changed to Cooper Industries in 1965. Today, they are the Compression Systems part of Cameron International Corp., based in Houston, Texas.”

From HERE

DIESELPUNK
Master Li & I are rather fond of Crossley engines, knowing of several splendid specimens at Anson Engine Museum we trail over Pennines especially to see them running. This is a fine example being lovingly preserved in the US.
Quote “After collecting a few smaller engines, he turned his eyes to the larger ones. His first large engine was a 1929 19-1/2 HP Crossley B95, serial no. 105379, manufactured by Crossley Bros., Ltd., of Openshaw, Manchester, England, that he bought from a collector 15 miles from where he grew up. “He showed it at Dalton, Minn., (Lake Region Pioneer Threshing Show) and ran it there for about 20 years,” Dustin says. “And when his health started going, I bought it from him in the spring of 2008.”


Dustin, who works with Monsanto Soybean Research, was attracted to the Crossley because it is a sideshaft engine. “They are a little more desirable and a little higher-end engines, and it just happened that my mom and dad knew this guy, and we knew he collected engines,” he says. “I had those small engines and wanted a big sideshaft one, and when the Crossley was for sale, I thought it was a cool engine, so I bought it. It just happened to be English.”
More HERE

DIESELPUNK

Master Li & I are rather fond of Crossley engines, knowing of several splendid specimens at Anson Engine Museum we trail over Pennines especially to see them running. This is a fine example being lovingly preserved in the US.

Quote “After collecting a few smaller engines, he turned his eyes to the larger ones. His first large engine was a 1929 19-1/2 HP Crossley B95, serial no. 105379, manufactured by Crossley Bros., Ltd., of Openshaw, Manchester, England, that he bought from a collector 15 miles from where he grew up. “He showed it at Dalton, Minn., (Lake Region Pioneer Threshing Show) and ran it there for about 20 years,” Dustin says. “And when his health started going, I bought it from him in the spring of 2008.”

Dustin, who works with Monsanto Soybean Research, was attracted to the Crossley because it is a sideshaft engine. “They are a little more desirable and a little higher-end engines, and it just happened that my mom and dad knew this guy, and we knew he collected engines,” he says. “I had those small engines and wanted a big sideshaft one, and when the Crossley was for sale, I thought it was a cool engine, so I bought it. It just happened to be English.”

More HERE

ABBEY PUMPING STATION

Abbey has lots of things to see including a two foot gauge industrial railway which offered rides behind this little Lister locomotive seen in top picture. Note it is not just large passenger Express locos that carry names, this is named ‘New Star’.

Interesting too was a rare Aveling & Perkins road roller driven by a well trained bear. I presume the Perkins part referred to the Peterborough diesel engine maker F. Perkins Limited

STEAM
"Don Parsio, Myrtle Creek, Ore., loves steam. He certainly likes agricultural steam engines, a fact witnessed by his enthusiastic ownership of a 1914 Aultman & Taylor 16-48 simple single. He also likes more industrial steam engines, like the 1913 Buffalo 12-ton roller he owns. And he likes even larger engines, like the 160-ton-capacity, 128-ton 1928 Bucyrus-Erie steam-powered crane he plays with every summer on the show grounds the Western Steam Fiends share with Antique Powerland Museum, Brooks, Ore."Read more: http://www.farmcollector.com/steam-traction/pulling-its-weight.aspx#ixzz33ksGRHM9

STEAM

"Don Parsio, Myrtle Creek, Ore., loves steam. He certainly likes agricultural steam engines, a fact witnessed by his enthusiastic ownership of a 1914 Aultman & Taylor 16-48 simple single. He also likes more industrial steam engines, like the 1913 Buffalo 12-ton roller he owns. And he likes even larger engines, like the 160-ton-capacity, 128-ton 1928 Bucyrus-Erie steam-powered crane he plays with every summer on the show grounds the Western Steam Fiends share with Antique Powerland Museum, Brooks, Ore."

Read more: http://www.farmcollector.com/steam-traction/pulling-its-weight.aspx#ixzz33ksGRHM9