DIESELPUNK
Auto Union Type A
"Porsche had previously been employed by Austro Daimler and Mercedes-Benz for whom he designed the highly successful S-Type racing car. Almost a decade earlier Rosenberg had successfully raced a mid-engined car and he convinced Porsche to follow that route for their new Grand Prix racer. They felt there were several major benefits of this layout. Firstly there would be considerably more weight on the rear axle, which should improve traction. Another advantage was that a prop-shaft running through the driver’s compartment was no longer required. This meant that the driver could sit considerably lower in the car, lowering the centre of gravity and also the wind resistance.The location of the engine was just the first of many unconventional design elements of the Porsche/Auto Union Grand Prix car. Even though Porsche was restricted to a maximum weight of 750 kg, he opted for a sixteen cylinder engine, keeping the mass down by using exotic alloys for the block and head. The cylinders were angled at 45 degrees, leaving just enough space for the intake manifold, which fed from the rear of the engine by a huge Rootes-Type Supercharger. Porsche opted for a simple and lightweight valvetrain consisting of a central camshaft, operating the valves to push-rods and rockers. In its first version, displacing just under 4.4 litres, the V16 engine produced 295 bhp at just 4500 rpm.”
Pic From HERE
Text from HERE

DIESELPUNK

Auto Union Type A

"Porsche had previously been employed by Austro Daimler and Mercedes-Benz for whom he designed the highly successful S-Type racing car. Almost a decade earlier Rosenberg had successfully raced a mid-engined car and he convinced Porsche to follow that route for their new Grand Prix racer. They felt there were several major benefits of this layout. Firstly there would be considerably more weight on the rear axle, which should improve traction. Another advantage was that a prop-shaft running through the driver’s compartment was no longer required. This meant that the driver could sit considerably lower in the car, lowering the centre of gravity and also the wind resistance.

The location of the engine was just the first of many unconventional design elements of the Porsche/Auto Union Grand Prix car. Even though Porsche was restricted to a maximum weight of 750 kg, he opted for a sixteen cylinder engine, keeping the mass down by using exotic alloys for the block and head. The cylinders were angled at 45 degrees, leaving just enough space for the intake manifold, which fed from the rear of the engine by a huge Rootes-Type Supercharger. Porsche opted for a simple and lightweight valvetrain consisting of a central camshaft, operating the valves to push-rods and rockers. In its first version, displacing just under 4.4 litres, the V16 engine produced 295 bhp at just 4500 rpm.”

Pic From HERE

Text from HERE

DIESELPUNK-Streamline Steam

"She arrived wreathed in steam and gleaming in the sunshine.

And this Grand Old Lady of the railways was given an enthusiastic welcome to Huddersfield by a clutch of steam buffs.

They gathered on the platform at Huddersfield railway station to welcome Bittern, an A4 Pacific class locomotive and sister to the record-breaking steam engine Mallard.

Bittern called into town for a 20-minute stop on her journey from the Crewe Heritage Centre to the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, where she will spend much of the summer.

Martin Wood, of Huddersfield, was one of the steam enthusiasts there to greet her.”

“Bittern passed through Huddersfield about a month ago on her way to Crewe from The Great Gathering of steam engines at the National Railway Museum in York, but did not stop.”

From HERE

DIESELPUNK
"Allen Millyard has done it again, this time taking two cylinders from a Pratt and Whitney 1340 radial and making himself a 5 liter V-Twin, the "Flying Millyard.
The original P&W 1340 radial was a nine cylinder, 1,344 cubic inch, 22 liter engine. The new 5 liter engine is intended for a Flying Merkel type board track racer, a BIG board track racer I imagine. This should impress the boys down at the Ace Cafe, don’t you think?”
From HERE

DIESELPUNK

"Allen Millyard has done it again, this time taking two cylinders from a Pratt and Whitney 1340 radial and making himself a 5 liter V-Twin, the "Flying Millyard.

The original P&W 1340 radial was a nine cylinder, 1,344 cubic inch, 22 liter engine. The new 5 liter engine is intended for a Flying Merkel type board track racer, a BIG board track racer I imagine. This should impress the boys down at the Ace Cafe, don’t you think?”

From HERE

DIESELPUNK
Quote:-   “This 1902 35 HP Hornsby-Akroyd is a hot bulb vaporizing oil engine built on Englishman Herbert Akroyd Stuart’s design. It uses a vaporizer that is heated by an external torch until it is almost a dull, glowing color, and the heavy oil is injected into the hot vaporizer on the intake stroke. During the compression stroke, the oil vaporizes, oxygen is pushed into the vaporizer and an explosion takes place near top dead center, causing the power stroke.
The De La Vergne Machine Co. eventually increased the compression pressure in these engines, reduced the size of the vaporizer, retimed it so it fired at the top of the compression and basically came up with what we call a modern diesel engine.
These engines are very low pressure, with about a 3:1 compression ratio, so they’re not very efficient. “This is one reason why the last place they were found was in the oil field, where the crude oil as a fuel was basically free,” Coolspring member Mike Murphy says. “The efficiency wasn’t that big of a deal for the oil industry — the reliability was. Some maintenance was required, because basically you had a distillery inside the engine. The vaporizer assembly had to be pulled apart to clean carbon and coke out of there that would build up over time.”
From HERE

DIESELPUNK

Quote:-   “This 1902 35 HP Hornsby-Akroyd is a hot bulb vaporizing oil engine built on Englishman Herbert Akroyd Stuart’s design. It uses a vaporizer that is heated by an external torch until it is almost a dull, glowing color, and the heavy oil is injected into the hot vaporizer on the intake stroke. During the compression stroke, the oil vaporizes, oxygen is pushed into the vaporizer and an explosion takes place near top dead center, causing the power stroke.

The De La Vergne Machine Co. eventually increased the compression pressure in these engines, reduced the size of the vaporizer, retimed it so it fired at the top of the compression and basically came up with what we call a modern diesel engine.

These engines are very low pressure, with about a 3:1 compression ratio, so they’re not very efficient. “This is one reason why the last place they were found was in the oil field, where the crude oil as a fuel was basically free,” Coolspring member Mike Murphy says. “The efficiency wasn’t that big of a deal for the oil industry — the reliability was. Some maintenance was required, because basically you had a distillery inside the engine. The vaporizer assembly had to be pulled apart to clean carbon and coke out of there that would build up over time.”

From HERE