DIESELPUNK

Quote:-   “The Soukup’s collection of Sandwich engines came about by accident, after Ed bought a 1-1/2 HP Cub Sandwich at an Isanti, Minn., auction in 1978, and he and his father restored it.

Ed bought his favorite Sandwich engine, a 1916 6 HP, in 1982 at a huge Rice Lake, Wis., auction featuring more than a hundred engines, including many large ones.

Seeing the 6 HP Sandwich engine amongst all those monsters made it look smaller. “When we saw it, I decided I was going to buy it,” Ed says. “I thought we would winch it up on planks onto the bed of our half-ton pickup.”

Not so fast. When they began winching, instead of the engine moving the pickup moved backward. So they had to wait until after dark when the auction tractor finally got to them. It lifted the 2,000-pound machine, including the base, with difficulty and lowered it into the truck bed.

“The back of the truck went down, down, down,” Ed says. “On the way home, the headlights shone up in the trees, and the front end steered funny. When Dad saw it, he said, ‘That’s a pretty big load for that pickup.”

From HERE

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Auto Union Type D
Quote:—-“Leading up to the end of 1937, Auto Union had won 32 of 54 races and needed a new contender for the upcoming restrictions that allowed a three-liter supercharged car with a minimum weight of 850 kgs. For this new formula they developed the Type D which raced alongside the best from Delahaye and Mercedes-Benz in the later half of 1938.”
From HERE

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Auto Union Type D

Quote:—-“Leading up to the end of 1937, Auto Union had won 32 of 54 races and needed a new contender for the upcoming restrictions that allowed a three-liter supercharged car with a minimum weight of 850 kgs. For this new formula they developed the Type D which raced alongside the best from Delahaye and Mercedes-Benz in the later half of 1938.”

From HERE

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Quote:—-Most engine collectors daydream of the “find of a lifetime”: Waiting in some forgotten barn or pump house, a very rare engine lies waiting, undiscovered, until fortune smiles and this engine comes home. For the vast majority of us, this is only a dream. For Bill Grimley, the dream became a reality. He came upon a 10 HP Schleicher, Schumm & Co. engine in an old factory in the 1970s when he was following up on a lead.

Company history

James and Adolph Schleicher came from Germany to the U.S. and, in 1876, set up a partnership to control N.A. Otto & Cie.’s patents in the U.S., and build and market their atmospheric engines. Before they were able to build any, Otto developed the 4-cycle “silent” engine, and it was this engine that they put into production. In 1877, they were joined by Herman Schumm, in Philadelphia, and set up Schleicher, Schumm & Co. in 1880. Nine engines were built that first year. The earliest engines were flame ignition slide-valve engines designed to run on illuminating gas, which was available in the larger cities at the time. These engines were available as late as 1892. In 1894 the company came under control of Gasmotoren-Fabrik Deutz and was reorganized as the Otto Gas Engine Works.

From HERE