WHEN MEN WERE MEN
It is hard to believe that Captain Frederick Gustavus Burnaby relaxing so indolently in Tissot’s picture  was the ultimate adventurer.
Yet at at El Tab, fighting the Dervishes, the bravest and most fanatical enemy the British ever faced, the wounded  Burnaby stood in his shirtsleeves OUTSIDE  the British square armed with  a double barrelled shotgun firing cartridges loaded with heavy  balls. (Like a Greener Gun). He got 13 Arabs with 23 shots.
He was heavily criticised by his enemies back home who said it was unsporting to pot dervishes with a shotgun instead of a rifle. Of course they were not facing 15,000 dervishes.
He later smuggled himself into the expedition to relieve Gordon in Khartoum and was killed on the 17th of  January 1885 in the Battle of Abu Klea  going to the aid of a skirmisher outside the square.
 The battle and one of its notable participants is mentioned in the song “Colonel Burnaby”, which has as its chorus:

Weep not my boys, for those who fell,
 They did not flinch nor fear.
 They stood their ground like Englishmen,
 and died at Abu Klea
(See next Post)

He is  the Colonel in Henry Newbolts famous poem 
Vitaï Lampada
There’s a breathless hush in the Close to-night—
Ten to make and the match to win—
A bumping pitch and a blinding light,
An hour to play and the last man in.
And it’s not for the sake of a ribboned coat,
Or the selfish hope of a season’s fame,
But his captain’s hand on his shoulder smote”
Play up! play up! and play the game!”
The sand of the desert is sodden red,—
Red with the wreck of a square that broke;—
The Gatling's jammed and the Colonel dead,
And the regiment blind with dust and smoke.
The river of death has brimmed his banks,
And England’s far, and Honour a name,
But the voice of a schoolboy rallies the ranks:
"Play up! play up! and play the game!"
This is the word that year by year,
While in her place the school is set,
Every one of her sons must hear,
And none that hears it dare forget.
This they all with a joyful mind
Bear through life like a torch in flame,
And falling fling to the host behind—
"Play up! play up! and play the game!"
 
 

WHEN MEN WERE MEN

It is hard to believe that Captain Frederick Gustavus Burnaby relaxing so indolently in Tissot’s picture  was the ultimate adventurer.

Yet at at El Tab, fighting the Dervishes, the bravest and most fanatical enemy the British ever faced, the wounded  Burnaby stood in his shirtsleeves OUTSIDE  the British square armed with  a double barrelled shotgun firing cartridges loaded with heavy  balls. (Like a Greener Gun). He got 13 Arabs with 23 shots.

He was heavily criticised by his enemies back home who said it was unsporting to pot dervishes with a shotgun instead of a rifle. Of course they were not facing 15,000 dervishes.

He later smuggled himself into the expedition to relieve Gordon in Khartoum and was killed on the 17th of  January 1885 in the Battle of Abu Klea  going to the aid of a skirmisher outside the square.

 The battle and one of its notable participants is mentioned in the song “Colonel Burnaby”, which has as its chorus:

Weep not my boys, for those who fell,

They did not flinch nor fear.

They stood their ground like Englishmen,

and died at Abu Klea

(See next Post)

He is  the Colonel in Henry Newbolts famous poem 

Vitaï Lampada

There’s a breathless hush in the Close to-night—

Ten to make and the match to win—

A bumping pitch and a blinding light,

An hour to play and the last man in.

And it’s not for the sake of a ribboned coat,

Or the selfish hope of a season’s fame,

But his captain’s hand on his shoulder smote

Play up! play up! and play the game!”

The sand of the desert is sodden red,—

Red with the wreck of a square that broke;—

The Gatling's jammed and the Colonel dead,

And the regiment blind with dust and smoke.

The river of death has brimmed his banks,

And England’s far, and Honour a name,

But the voice of a schoolboy rallies the ranks:

"Play up! play up! and play the game!"

This is the word that year by year,

While in her place the school is set,

Every one of her sons must hear,

And none that hears it dare forget.

This they all with a joyful mind

Bear through life like a torch in flame,

And falling fling to the host behind—

"Play up! play up! and play the game!"

 

 

Detective Story
Linda6 sent me this page  HERE. I remarked that one, C57, looked remarkably like a Tissot. I looked on the Images of Albion page HERE and found indeed it was a Tissot.

I then found that the Flickr page was connected to Angel Oil Painting Art Co.Who say——-“Angel Oil Painting Art Co.,Ltd is established on 1998. we offer quality        hand-painted oil painting reproductions of        masterpiece.We have fantastic expert artist in China who have many years of experience        reproducing masterpiece.”—-“Each painting is quality hand painted by our talented        artist under the close supervision of our quality control team. we are an art direct   company, we don’t purchase any paintings from the third sources, that’s why we   can offer good price with top quality oil paintings.”
So if you want a genuine fake of an old master contact the Angel Oil Painting Art Co HERE
From their Flickr page HERE 

Detective Story

Linda6 sent me this page  HERE. I remarked that one, C57, looked remarkably like a Tissot. I looked on the Images of Albion page HERE and found indeed it was a Tissot.

I then found that the Flickr page was connected to Angel Oil Painting Art Co.Who say——-“Angel Oil Painting Art Co.,Ltd is established on 1998. we offer quality hand-painted oil painting reproductions of masterpiece.We have fantastic expert artist in China who have many years of experience reproducing masterpiece.”—-“Each painting is quality hand painted by our talented artist under the close supervision of our quality control team. we are an art direct company, we don’t purchase any paintings from the third sources, that’s why we can offer good price with top quality oil paintings.”

So if you want a genuine fake of an old master contact the Angel Oil Painting Art Co HERE

From their Flickr page HERE 

Tissot must have been very fond of that white and yellow dress as it features in “A Convalescent” above and “A Passing Storm” below. In the pictures of this period Mrs Newton is usually reclining as she was in the last stages of consumption.



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Tissot must have been very fond of that white and yellow dress as it features in “A Convalescent” above and “A Passing Storm” below. In the pictures of this period Mrs Newton is usually reclining as she was in the last stages of consumption.

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