DIESELPUNK
Quote” Russ’s steam-driven creation is an unusual machine to see at a farm show (or anywhere, really). A homemade device cobbled together with disparate parts, it uses the frame of a Model T auto, wheels from a Ford Falcon (adapted to make the rims fit), front and rear Model T axles (cut and narrowed), a jackshaft to reduce the speed of the 1935 Plymouth transmission, a Rockford twin-disc clutch off a 4-cylinder Wisconsin engine, a Model T steering wheel and emergency cable handbrake, and a Little Giant steam boiler (serial no. 1244), manufactured by C.H. Dutton Co., Kalamazoo, Mich., dating to about 1925.
“That came from a hat company in Minneapolis that used steam to make hats to fit or shape them to size,” Gene says. “The pulley came from a steam engine that ran cream separators at a creamery in Elk River, Minn.” The Case plate attached to the side? Probably just for looks, Gene says.
The result is an odd-looking machine that careens around the occasional Minnesota tractor show at about 2 mph. “You can only drive it for 500-600 feet before you have to wait to get the steam back up,” Gene says. “But if you just sit there and idle, it makes a heck of a nice display.”
Read more: http://www.farmcollector.com/steam-engines/steam-driven-rustmobile-zmbz13junzbea.aspx#ixzz37YXZhwww

DIESELPUNK

Quote” Russ’s steam-driven creation is an unusual machine to see at a farm show (or anywhere, really). A homemade device cobbled together with disparate parts, it uses the frame of a Model T auto, wheels from a Ford Falcon (adapted to make the rims fit), front and rear Model T axles (cut and narrowed), a jackshaft to reduce the speed of the 1935 Plymouth transmission, a Rockford twin-disc clutch off a 4-cylinder Wisconsin engine, a Model T steering wheel and emergency cable handbrake, and a Little Giant steam boiler (serial no. 1244), manufactured by C.H. Dutton Co., Kalamazoo, Mich., dating to about 1925.

“That came from a hat company in Minneapolis that used steam to make hats to fit or shape them to size,” Gene says. “The pulley came from a steam engine that ran cream separators at a creamery in Elk River, Minn.” The Case plate attached to the side? Probably just for looks, Gene says.

The result is an odd-looking machine that careens around the occasional Minnesota tractor show at about 2 mph. “You can only drive it for 500-600 feet before you have to wait to get the steam back up,” Gene says. “But if you just sit there and idle, it makes a heck of a nice display.”



Read more: http://www.farmcollector.com/steam-engines/steam-driven-rustmobile-zmbz13junzbea.aspx#ixzz37YXZhwww

morganas-cat
morganas-cat:

steampunksteampunk:

Melissa-Salvatore

What a splendid locomotive; with luck Cloggy will pop up and tell me what it is! The young women are splendid too of course, love the striking but muted colours of their clothes and hair especially.

Cloggy:— All I can tell you Cat is that it is Russian. One of those copies of the big American 1930’s Steam Loco’s Joe Stalin had built.. Thanks for lead to Melissa-Salvatore, good stuff there.

morganas-cat:

steampunksteampunk:

Melissa-Salvatore

What a splendid locomotive; with luck Cloggy will pop up and tell me what it is! The young women are splendid too of course, love the striking but muted colours of their clothes and hair especially.

Cloggy:— All I can tell you Cat is that it is Russian. One of those copies of the big American 1930’s Steam Loco’s Joe Stalin had built.. Thanks for lead to Melissa-Salvatore, good stuff there.

ABBEY PUMPING STATION

The Pumping Stationdid not open its gates until midday and as we had set off at 9am we had to wait for them to open. As we were parked in the National Space Centre car park, which is next door to the Pumping Station, we decided to have a coffee in their cafe. MISTAKE. It was the worst coffee I have ever tasted. During the war the Germans used to make ersatz coffee by roasting acorns and grinding them up. I now know what it must have tasted like. To compound matters the cafe was in the bottom of a tall structure (seen in the background of the Steam shovel picture) that housed two very tall, full size  replica Atlas or Saturn Space Rockets. The tables in the cafe were between their fins. After a message over a Tannoy there was a thunderous roar, the rocket tailpipe glowed red and vast clouds of white smoke came out of it, filling the cafe with a dense fog. This continued at short intervals.  We were very glad when the Pumping Station opened its doors.

Top Pic. Statue of spaceman with chimney of Pumping Station in background.

Lower Pic. This magnificent relic of TheSteam Age greeted you as you walked in.

ABBEY PUMPING STATION

There was only one place on the planet you could see 4 beam pumping engines running together.The place was Abbey Pumping Station in Leicester, the time was 28th/29th of June and Master Li and I were there to see and hear them. Not as a result of long term planning, but Happenstance or Serendipity. We had planned to go to the traction Engine Rally at North Anston in South Yorkshire. There was heavy rain on Saturday and we knew it would be bad underfoot on Sunday and Master Li’s van is very skittish on wet grass. I looked in an events calender for an inside location and found that Abbey would be steaming so off we went down a surprisingly event free M1 to Leicester.

Abbey Pumping Station was steaming indeed. Their four engines are all in working order but their boiler will only steam one engine. At a pinch it will steam two but runs out of puff in 20 minutes.

To mark 50 years since the Pumping Station closed they had hired in a high power steam generator so they could run all four together. It is unlikely to ever happen again as it cost £10,000 for the weekends hire !!

So a unique event and happy chance for me & Li.

Top pics the four engines running

Bottom Pic the high power steam generator

STEAM
"Don Parsio, Myrtle Creek, Ore., loves steam. He certainly likes agricultural steam engines, a fact witnessed by his enthusiastic ownership of a 1914 Aultman & Taylor 16-48 simple single. He also likes more industrial steam engines, like the 1913 Buffalo 12-ton roller he owns. And he likes even larger engines, like the 160-ton-capacity, 128-ton 1928 Bucyrus-Erie steam-powered crane he plays with every summer on the show grounds the Western Steam Fiends share with Antique Powerland Museum, Brooks, Ore."Read more: http://www.farmcollector.com/steam-traction/pulling-its-weight.aspx#ixzz33ksGRHM9

STEAM

"Don Parsio, Myrtle Creek, Ore., loves steam. He certainly likes agricultural steam engines, a fact witnessed by his enthusiastic ownership of a 1914 Aultman & Taylor 16-48 simple single. He also likes more industrial steam engines, like the 1913 Buffalo 12-ton roller he owns. And he likes even larger engines, like the 160-ton-capacity, 128-ton 1928 Bucyrus-Erie steam-powered crane he plays with every summer on the show grounds the Western Steam Fiends share with Antique Powerland Museum, Brooks, Ore."

Read more: http://www.farmcollector.com/steam-traction/pulling-its-weight.aspx#ixzz33ksGRHM9

Steam Ice Cream

TOP
"Engineer Harrison Hitchcock lubricates the scale model steam engine, maintains the boiler’s water level and firebox wood supply, and monitors flywheel speed."

BOTTOM

"Cinnamon sourdough french toast topped with Terry’s rum raisin ice cream – a popular treat at the Los Angeles Live Steamers Railroad Museum."


Read more: http://www.farmcollector.com/equipment/steam-cream-zm0z13mayzbea.aspx#ixzz33kuXsllr