DIESELPUNK

Top Picture “This 1915 10 HP Mogul was Lyle’s first Mogul engine. The flywheel is 41 inches in diameter with a face of 3-1/2 inches. The engine weighs 3,658 pounds. The silver pipe is the exhaust pipe with the muffler on top. The green pipe is the breather pipe, which brings back warm air from the running engine to make it start and run better.”

Lower Picture— Condition as found Witte Type B

Quote :—-“

"When Lyle Dumont does something, he does it in a big way. Like the time in 1969 when he bought more than 400 antique gas engines in one fell swoop.!!!!""It turned out those were three of more than 400 engines, so Lyle decided to buy not just those three, but all 400-plus gasoline engines from the estate. Included in the trove were a number of very rare engines, including an entire set of the square-tank headless Witte engines, a Falk, a couple of rare screen-cooled International Harvester Moguls, an upright Monitor that stood over 6 feet high and many others.”

Read More HERE

DIESELPUNK
"Allen Millyard has done it again, this time taking two cylinders from a Pratt and Whitney 1340 radial and making himself a 5 liter V-Twin, the "Flying Millyard.
The original P&W 1340 radial was a nine cylinder, 1,344 cubic inch, 22 liter engine. The new 5 liter engine is intended for a Flying Merkel type board track racer, a BIG board track racer I imagine. This should impress the boys down at the Ace Cafe, don’t you think?”
From HERE

DIESELPUNK

"Allen Millyard has done it again, this time taking two cylinders from a Pratt and Whitney 1340 radial and making himself a 5 liter V-Twin, the "Flying Millyard.

The original P&W 1340 radial was a nine cylinder, 1,344 cubic inch, 22 liter engine. The new 5 liter engine is intended for a Flying Merkel type board track racer, a BIG board track racer I imagine. This should impress the boys down at the Ace Cafe, don’t you think?”

From HERE

ENGINEERING

Lost in admiration.Home designed and built. Mostly hacked out of solid, for a start at left is a solid, 14-pound block aluminum, type 6061. At right is the block after it’s been profiled for the crankcase, now weighing in at 5 pounds.     Perseverence indeed.

Quote “Approximate time to design and build: about 1,200 hours. Yes  — I am retired …”

Read more  HERE

My admiration for that great engineer Amherst Villiers began when I had “Split Seconds” given to me for my birthday in my teens. I read of his work on Raymond Mays  amazing ‘Villiers Supercharge’ which was all conquering in 1930’s hillclimbs. 
When I saw a mention of his aero engine I just had to know more and chased it down to this article in a 1936 edition of ‘Flight’.
 Interesting engine, especially the air cooling of the cylinder heads.
From HERE

My admiration for that great engineer Amherst Villiers began when I had “Split Seconds” given to me for my birthday in my teens. I read of his work on Raymond Mays  amazing ‘Villiers Supercharge’ which was all conquering in 1930’s hillclimbs.

When I saw a mention of his aero engine I just had to know more and chased it down to this article in a 1936 edition of ‘Flight’.

Interesting engine, especially the air cooling of the cylinder heads.

From HERE

DIESELPUNK

Quote”What could be better than a 9 cylinder radial engine? Why, a home built 9 cylinder radial, of course! Russell Sutton continues to work on his engine projects, (yes, I said projects, because he’s already beginning his next engine) and we just received the latest updates on the radial build many of you have been following which began many years ago using 9 cylinders and heads from the Honda XR600 single.

In the last video of this project, Russell said he was setting this radial up as a running display and, to that end, it’s been mounted on a permanent stand with a fuel tank, an oil tank and cooler and all of the associated plumbing. The next step will be to engineer a full engine management system and for that, he’s purchased a Megasquirt ECU and added extra processors to control spark and sequential fuel injection.”

Master Li and I raise our flat caps in due respect to this bloke who builds his own 9 cyl radial out of 9 Single Cyl  Motorbike cylinders. Amazing.

From HERE

WHEN MEN WERE MEN

These two pictures sum up my time in Engineering. When I started parts were made by highly skilled men on fairly basic machine tools. When I finished parts were made by computer controlled machine tools, the men being totally de-skilled, reduced to just loading the machines until a robot came along to do it.

The only skill left is to be found in the Preservation movement where men still make parts for old steam engines, cars etc on proper centre lathes, milling machines or shapers.

Now this is REAL engineering.

Paul Gorrell had  two 4 cylinder Crossley engines “one had a damaged cylinder on the front end and the other had a damaged cylinder on the rear end. I cut the two bad cylinders off, leaving three good front and three good rear cylinders. I welded the two 3s together, making a 6-cylinder Crosley block. I did the same with the crankcase, pan, overhead cam cover, intake and exhaust manifolds.The crankshaft and camshaft were trickier. The engine crank and camshaft throws, or lobes, on 4-cylinder engines are 180 degrees apart while 6-cylinder crank and camshaft throws are 120 degrees apart. I cut the steel crankshaft and cam between the throws and added two throws and four cam lobes from a donor crank and cam. ————-“I also have a 4-cylinder cast iron Crosley engine that sank in the boat that it powered. It was raised, but the two center cylinders were not drained and froze, splitting them. I got the engine for parts so I used as many as I could. I’ve always said everything can be used for something. So like a good apple with a bad place I cut the two bad center cylinders, crankcase, etc. out. I welded the two good end cylinders, etc. together. I used left-over crank, cam, etc. parts from the 6-cylinder project. It made a strong-running, first 2-cylinder, inline, water-cooled, 22 CID, OHC, 13 HP factory-looking Crosley engine. Some things are just junk until you rearrange the parts.”——-

and this is the REALLY AMAZING bit

Then I thought, 8 cylinders would be great! So with more use of my hand tools and another mere 2,000 hours, one winter I built the super 8-cylinder opposed Flat Eight Crosley engine”——- which he put in this Three-Quarter Midget Racing Car.!!!!!!

That is real Engineering

Read about it HERE

 

STEAMPUNK
Engineering workshop back in the days before Common Sense had been banned and Health & Stupidity ruled the world.
Those days really weeded out the stupid and careless so the gene pool got better and better. Now even the  thickest survive and breed. The gene pool gets worse & worse.

STEAMPUNK

Engineering workshop back in the days before Common Sense had been banned and Health & Stupidity ruled the world.

Those days really weeded out the stupid and careless so the gene pool got better and better. Now even the  thickest survive and breed. The gene pool gets worse & worse.