HAREWOOD SPEED HILLCLIMB
Spectator Car Park
Master Li pensively studies another replica we found in the Spectators Car Park. Details we found out about it:-
1953 Bentley R-Type ‘Speed Six Replica’ TourerRegistration no. GSL 736Chassis no. B310TOEngine no. W254C






Quote :—“What we do know is that it started life as a 1953 R Type Bentley with Standard Steel body, chassis No. B301TO (registration number NOL 5) and was delivered new to a Mr G E Payne of Rudders & Payne Ltd. Its subsequent reconfiguration into a ‘W.O. Bentley-esque’, three-seater special is thought to have taken place over a period of some 12 years and perhaps been the work of two people. Neither man is alive today - indeed it appears the owner died shortly after the car was completed, and his widow advertised it for £79,950 during 2001/2. It ultimately changed hands in April 2002 and again in 2007, when it was acquired by the vendor.












The Bentley is mentioned in Ray Roberts’ book ‘Bentley Specials and Special Bentleys’, Vol. 2, page 611, where he describes it as featuring ‘two-seater vintage style open bodywork following behind a vintage Bentley Speed Six type radiator’. This imposing machine measures c.16ft long, c.6ft 2in wide and has a c.10ft 7in wheelbase. The flowing coachwork is finished in British Racing Green and the wings in Black. A battery box is mounted on the offside running board. Up front, a pair of Lucas P100 headlights sandwich the aforementioned vintage-style radiator. The interior, that sports two seats up front and a third one in the rear, is trimmed in green leather. The original R Type instruments reside in the centre of a bespoke wooden facia. The gate gearchange is in the middle of the car. Twin brown leather straps secure the extensive bonnet, either side of which is mounted a 21in wire wheel identical to those on which the car rides. The weather equipment comprises both a folding windscreen and a pair of aeroscreens, a double duck hood with oval rear window (plastic) and a tonneau cover - there are no sidescreens.
The special (road registered as ‘GSL 736’) is powered by what is believed to be 4.25-litre Bentley MKVI engine that’s fed by a pair of SU carburettors. The specification includes a modern alternator, twin electric cooling fans, quick release radiator cap and a bespoke exhaust heat shield. Braking is by drums all round and the suspension features Spax telescopic dampers at the rear. We understand the cruciform element of the R Type chassis has been removed.
The vendor has apparently carried out a degree of tidying up during his ownership and regards the coachwork as “very sound”, the paintwork as “well finished”, the engine as “smooth and without leaks” and the transmission as “quiet and smooth”. The Bentley is MOT’d into May 2010 and taxed until the end of April. If you fancy cutting a dash in vintagestyle, this could well be the car for you.”
Sold For £51,700. if it had been the real thing multiply that by 10
See HERE

HAREWOOD SPEED HILLCLIMB

Spectator Car Park

Master Li pensively studies another replica we found in the Spectators Car Park. Details we found out about it:-

1953 Bentley R-Type ‘Speed Six Replica’ Tourer
Registration no. GSL 736
Chassis no. B310TO
Engine no. W254C

Quote :—“What we do know is that it started life as a 1953 R Type Bentley with Standard Steel body, chassis No. B301TO (registration number NOL 5) and was delivered new to a Mr G E Payne of Rudders & Payne Ltd. Its subsequent reconfiguration into a ‘W.O. Bentley-esque’, three-seater special is thought to have taken place over a period of some 12 years and perhaps been the work of two people. Neither man is alive today - indeed it appears the owner died shortly after the car was completed, and his widow advertised it for £79,950 during 2001/2. It ultimately changed hands in April 2002 and again in 2007, when it was acquired by the vendor.

The Bentley is mentioned in Ray Roberts’ book ‘Bentley Specials and Special Bentleys’, Vol. 2, page 611, where he describes it as featuring ‘two-seater vintage style open bodywork following behind a vintage Bentley Speed Six type radiator’. This imposing machine measures c.16ft long, c.6ft 2in wide and has a c.10ft 7in wheelbase. The flowing coachwork is finished in British Racing Green and the wings in Black. A battery box is mounted on the offside running board. Up front, a pair of Lucas P100 headlights sandwich the aforementioned vintage-style radiator. The interior, that sports two seats up front and a third one in the rear, is trimmed in green leather. The original R Type instruments reside in the centre of a bespoke wooden facia. The gate gearchange is in the middle of the car. Twin brown leather straps secure the extensive bonnet, either side of which is mounted a 21in wire wheel identical to those on which the car rides. The weather equipment comprises both a folding windscreen and a pair of aeroscreens, a double duck hood with oval rear window (plastic) and a tonneau cover - there are no sidescreens.

The special (road registered as ‘GSL 736’) is powered by what is believed to be 4.25-litre Bentley MKVI engine that’s fed by a pair of SU carburettors. The specification includes a modern alternator, twin electric cooling fans, quick release radiator cap and a bespoke exhaust heat shield. Braking is by drums all round and the suspension features Spax telescopic dampers at the rear. We understand the cruciform element of the R Type chassis has been removed.

The vendor has apparently carried out a degree of tidying up during his ownership and regards the coachwork as “very sound”, the paintwork as “well finished”, the engine as “smooth and without leaks” and the transmission as “quiet and smooth”. The Bentley is MOT’d into May 2010 and taxed until the end of April. If you fancy cutting a dash in vintagestyle, this could well be the car for you.”

Sold For £51,700. if it had been the real thing multiply that by 10

See HERE

HAREWOOD SPEED HILLCLIMB
Spectator Car Park
Master Li always says it is worth the £10 entry fee just to look round the Spectator Car Park. Never more so than an Sunday when we came across this soon after arriving. The owner, here chatting to Master Li, told us that his friend has a Type 35 worth the thick end of a million quid and understandably dare not drive it. The bloke here  took a mould off the body and built two replicas on VW chassis and engine. They have everything you expect in a 1930’s sports/racing car with the battery in that wooden box worthy of George Hepplewhite. Note the fuel pressure pump on the drivers side. There was a spare wheel and Pyrene fire extinguisher clamped outside the passenger side. It is apotheosis of a 1930’s sports/racing car from the knock off Rudge wheels to the leather straps on the bonnet . Brilliant

HAREWOOD SPEED HILLCLIMB

Spectator Car Park

Master Li always says it is worth the £10 entry fee just to look round the Spectator Car Park. Never more so than an Sunday when we came across this soon after arriving. The owner, here chatting to Master Li, told us that his friend has a Type 35 worth the thick end of a million quid and understandably dare not drive it. The bloke here  took a mould off the body and built two replicas on VW chassis and engine. They have everything you expect in a 1930’s sports/racing car with the battery in that wooden box worthy of George Hepplewhite. Note the fuel pressure pump on the drivers side. There was a spare wheel and Pyrene fire extinguisher clamped outside the passenger side. It is apotheosis of a 1930’s sports/racing car from the knock off Rudge wheels to the leather straps on the bonnet . Brilliant